Recognizing Domestic Violence

How Do You Know Someone is Suffering From a Domestic Violence Situation?

If you’re suffering from domestic violence, you may already know that you need to leave. But leaving a dangerous situation can be very difficult. You may even need a legal defense team if you are looking to file for divorce, gain custody of a child, or deal with other situations a messy separation might bring up.

But how do you know if you’re in an abusive relationship?

domestic violence legal help

While abuse can be different for everyone, there are some pretty common signs of abuse. These can include everything from controlling your money to physical violence.

Controlling, Threatening, & Bullying Behavior

If your partner yells at you and makes you feel less-than, punches the wall or throws things when they’re angry, threatens to harm or kill someone close to you or you, tries to control how you look, is overly critical, or accuses you of having an affair, then you may be in an abusive relationship.

No one is perfect, and there will be times when you and your partner disagree or have heated arguments, but there should always be a level of respect and care, even when you’re both angry. When your partner tramples that and crosses the line between having a disagreement and being emotionally or mentally abusive, this is not a healthy situation.

Controlling Finances

Since abusers typically base their abuse on control, it’s easy to see why controlling your finances can be a clear sign of abuse.

Some ways abusers control your finances are to make sure they keep all of the credit cards and cash away from you, they give you an allowance but expect you to tell them where every dollar you spend goes, they may control if you work and what kind of job you can have, they may even keep the money for basic things like clothes and food from you, and steal from your friends or from you.

Isolation

Another way to ensure their control over you is to keep you away from your family and friends. This can include anything from embarrassing you in front of your friends and family so badly that you feel you need to avoid those people to making you ask for permission to see them. This means that keeping close tabs on where you go and who you go with can be a very clear sign of abusive behavior.

Sexual & Physical Abuse

Of course, everyone knows that if you’re being hit, you’re being abused. But there is more to it than getting hit or having a weapon against you. Any sort of physical assault, even just hair pulling, abuses if it is unwanted. Refusing to let you in to your house (locking you out), and keeping you from seeking medical care, sleeping, or eating are all also signs of abuse.

Likewise, just because you’re in a relationship or married doesn’t mean that you “owe” your partner sex or sexual favors. Forcing you to have sex, making you dress more provocatively than you’re comfortable with, telling you that you “owe” them sex, trying to force you to have their baby or get them pregnant, and trying to give you STDs are all signs of sexual abuse.

Since men are usually stronger than their partners, female abusers typically wait for them to be asleep before they attack, attack them by surprise, or abuse their children or pets to “weaken” them.

If you still aren’t sure if you’re being abused, call the National Domestic Violence Hotline. 1-800-799-SAFE (7233). Not only can they give you guidance, but they can also refer you to resources to help you get assistance. You can also ask your church, doctor, family, friends, and even neighbors for help to get out of a dangerous situation.

You’ll also want to come up with an escape plan. This can include making and hiding an extra set of keys, packing a bag with any important paperwork, spare cash, clothes, and medicine that you need. (You may want to keep this bag at a friend’s house.) Come up with a code word that you can tell your co-workers, friends, family, or even children so that they know you’re in danger and should call the police. Try to also know where you’re going to go and how you’re going to get there.

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Law Offices of Gary L Rohlwing

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from https://www.criminal-duiattorney.com/criminal-defense/domestic-violence/recognizing-when-it-has-happened/

Effects of COVID on Criminal Cases

COVID-19 continues to wreak havoc across America and has left no area of the country untouched. The virus has even affected policing and criminal justice. In many states and counties, the enforcement of stay-at-home orders and other virus-related restrictions are a top priority. New laws have been passed and police have been given the authority to penalize people who repeatedly or seriously violate such orders.

Enforcement is not the only thing that has changed. The virus has also had an impact on how criminal cases are processed and handled. The resurgence of the virus in late autumn forced many courts to shut down completely. Courts in some jurisdictions have decided to finish trials that have started but not to begin new trials.

In many instances, how courts decide to handle criminal cases depends on how well-resourced they are. Much has been learned about the virus since March 2020. Many courts have the money and have had the time to take their proceedings entirely online. These courts have remained largely unaffected by the latest upsurge in cases and the re-imposition of lockdown orders.

Your Right to a Speedy Trial

If you are in a jurisdiction that has been severely affected by COVID-19, your trial date may have been postponed. Despite the distribution of the vaccine, no one knows when the pandemic will be brought under control. However, your right to a speedy trial remains in effect. The Sixth Amendment to the Constitution gives you this right. You may need to hire a criminal defense lawyer to help you protect it.

Courts have the right to set aside a conviction or sentence if your 6th Amendment rights are violated. In many states, the legislatures have not modified the amount of time that a prosecutor has to bring a defendant to trial. If you are among the backlog of cases in a jurisdiction, you should speak to your Arizona lawyer about having the charges against you thrown out owing to the violation of your constitutional rights.

Plea Bargaining

COVID-19 has also affected plea bargaining. The virus created a health crisis in America’s prison systems. The close proximity of inmates and corrections officers has led to an alarming rise in cases among both. A jail and prison system that was already suffering under the weight of overcrowding and congestion cannot afford the imprisonment of more people.

This has put prosecutors at a disadvantage in plea bargaining. They have even more of an incentive to reach a plea agreement which could keep you out of the unhealthy conditions of prison. This will also help reduce the prosecutor’s backlog of cases so that they do not risk having defendants go free owing to 6th Amendment violations.

You should speak to your criminal attorney about pushing an even harder bargaining position with the prosecutor. You may be able to get an even lighter sentence than you would have before owing to these changes. If you have been arrested and charged with a crime, your criminal defense lawyer should be looking for ways to leverage the conditions of the pandemic to get you the best deal possible.

The following blog post Effects of COVID on Criminal Cases is courtesy of Gary Rohlwing Law



Law Offices of Gary L Rohlwing

7112 N 55th Ave

Glendale, AZ 85301

(623) 937-1692

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from https://www.criminal-duiattorney.com/criminal-defense/misdemeanors/effects-of-covid-on-criminal-cases/

What to Do if You’ve Been Arrested for White Collar Crime in Arizona?

White-collar crimes are non-violent crimes that usually involve financial or business affairs. Money laundering, embezzlement, and tax evasion are all examples of white-collar crimes. They are often referred to as victimless crimes.

However, just because the crime does not involve violence, does not mean that the prosecutors will go easy on you. In fact, you can face imprisonment, fines, probation, and forfeiture of assets if you are convicted of a white-collar crime. You may also be required to pay restitution to the business or person that you defrauded.

That is why it is a good idea for you to call an Arizona criminal attorney if you are being charged with any of these crimes. They can come up with a credible and strong defense for you to use in court.

How Can You Be Found Guilty of a White-Collar Crime?

In order for you to be convicted of a criminal offense, the prosecution has to be able to prove that you broke the law. You may be less likely to be found guilty of a crime if you do not enter into the situation with the intention of committing a crime. However, it is important to note that you do not have to successfully complete a crime in order to be found guilty of one.

It is possible for you to be found guilty if you had a plan in place, but you did not carry it out. For example, you made a plan to embezzle money but you stopped before you used any money. You can still be convicted of a crime.

Defenses to White Collar Crimes

One of the reasons that it’s important to hire a criminal lawyer is because they will be able to come up with the right defense. The following is a list of defenses that can be used in these types of cases.

Lack of Intent

In some cases, prosecutors are required to prove intent to perform an illegal action. For example, you are facing tax fraud charges. They have to be able to prove that you intended to commit a crime. Simply making a mistake while you file your taxes is not enough to convict someone of tax fraud.

Entrapment

Entrapment is one of the most common white-collar defenses used. Police officers may suspect a group of people are committing a crime. They may set up a sting operation in order to convict someone. However, if the defense can prove that the informants or officers induced you to commit a crime, then you will likely have your charges dropped.

Incapacity

If you were mentally or physically impaired at the time you committed the crime, then your criminal attorney can use this as a form of defense. They can prove that you were unable to make reasonable decisions.

Intoxication

Intoxication can sometimes be used as a defense. The attorney can argue that you were not able to control your actions and you may be able to bargain for a lesser sentence or offense.

If you are in need of a criminal attorney, then you should consider contacting The Law Offices of Gary L Rohlwing.

What to Do if You’ve Been Arrested for White Collar Crime in Arizona? Find more on: LawOfficesGaryRohlwing



Law Offices of Gary L Rohlwing

7112 N 55th Ave

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(623) 937-1692

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from https://www.criminal-duiattorney.com/criminal-defense/felonies/arrested-for-white-collar-crime-in-arizona/

Steps in a Criminal Case

Handling a criminal case in Arizona can be complicated. If you’ve been charged with a crime or you worry that you will be, it may be in your best interest to learn the various steps in a criminal case. For in-depth guidance on the steps in a criminal case in Arizona, contact a competent criminal attorney from the Law Offices of Gary L Rohlwing.

criminal in court
The following constitute some of the steps in a criminal case in Arizona:

Arrest

The law enforcement officers (i.e., the police) are responsible for effecting an arrest. After conducting a thorough investigation and finding a probable cause to believe that you are responsible for the alleged crime, the police will proceed to either arrest you or cite you for an appearance before a criminal court.

First appearance

The first appearance is commonly known as the initial appearance. The hearing confirms the defendant’s names, reading charges and, in case of a felony, the appointment of an attorney if the defendant does not have one. At this stage, the defendant can apply for bail or bond. Upon such application, the judge will have to decide on whether to release the defendant or not. Once you are released on bail or bond, it is advisable to contact a criminal defense attorney for assistance with launching a competent defense.

Preliminary hearing

A preliminary hearing is common with felonies. In case your charge falls under the category of a felony, it is advisable to work closely with your criminal defense attorney. It’s at the preliminary hearing that witnesses give their testimonies. Where the evidence and testimonies presented show that there is probable cause to hold the defendant liable, the judge fixes the criminal case for trial.

Grand jury

In some instances, the jury commission selects grand jury to determine if the charges should be brought before a full court. The decision reached by the grand jury is straight forward. If they think there is enough evidence that the defendant could be guilty, they vote to allow the case to go to a full trial.

Arraignment

Arraignment is simply the plea taking center stage once the grand jury has presented its verdict to the court. This is the part you might remember from a movie where the judge reads the charges to the defendant and they declare that they ‘plea’ guilty or not guilty. If the accused person accepts the verdict, such acceptance is a guilty plea. If the accused person disputes the verdict, the judge will enter a plea of not guilty. Working closely with our Arizona lawyer from Law Offices of Gary L Rohlwing gives you a chance to know what plea will work in your advantage. In the event you take a not guilty plea, the case will proceed to trial. Where the judge enters a plea of guilty, the judge will set a date for sentencing.

Trial

At the trial stage, the accused person gets to defend their case. The trial stage gives the defense team a chance to prove the accused person’s evidence. As usual, the defense case comes after the prosecution case. Therefore, the defense team is well aware of the facts and evidence they will be defending against.

The article Steps in a Criminal Case was first seen on Gary Rohlwing www.criminal-duiattorney.com/



Law Offices of Gary L Rohlwing

7112 N 55th Ave

Glendale, AZ 85301

(623) 937-1692

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from https://www.criminal-duiattorney.com/criminal-defense/felonies/steps-in-a-criminal-case/

What is Considered a Criminal Damage Charge in Arizona

Being arrested and charged with defacing and damaging the property of another is serious, and you should respond to the situation with decisiveness. Under Arizona law, criminal damage is defined as a crime against property. It is often charged in conjunction with crimes related to theft and the commission of similar offenses. If convicted, you can be imprisoned and forced to pay fines and the cost of repairs.

If you have been arrested for this crime, you should contact an Arizona lawyer. The officers who take you into custody may try to coax a confession out of you or tell you that they already know everything you’ve done. Even if you think it might be in your best interest to cooperate, you can do this safely with a lawyer present.

You can exercise your Fifth Amendment right to remain silent until your lawyer arrives and then discuss the situation with them. Even if you are being squeezed to give someone else up or you know you had nothing to do with the crime, it’s best to have a professional to talk to who deals with these kinds of situations all the time. They will not be flustered by police interrogation and will not allow you to inadvertently incriminate yourself.

What Constitutes Criminal Damage

According to Arizona law, criminal damage consists of:

-Recklessly defacing or damaging property
-Recklessly tampering with the property of another person in a way that degrades its function or value
-Drawing a message, slogan, or symbol on any public or private building without the permission of the owner

The Possible Penalties for Criminal Damage

Penalties for criminal damage depend on the value of the property. They are as follows:

-For property worth less than $250, you can spend up to four months in jail
-For property worth between $250 to $1,000, you can spend up to six months in jail
-For property worth between $1,000 to $2,000, you can spend up to a year in jail or prison
-For property worth between $2,000 to $10,000, you can spend 18 months in jail or prison
-Property damage over $10,000 can put you in prison for 2.5 years

You will also have to pay for the cost of the materials and labor that will be required to repair the damaged property.

Defending Yourself

Being charged with a crime is not the same as being convicted of a crime. When you are arrested, the authorities may make you feel as though there is an equivalence between the two. But if you did not commit this offense, then you should fight the charge.

The first thing your criminal defense lawyer will do is ask the police to present the evidence they have against you. If the only thing they have is the mention of your name in connection with such a crime or the description of a man vaguely resembling your age or race, then your criminal attorney can get to work to have you released. If they have solid proof that you were at the scene of the crime, they may be able to hold you but your attorney will be with you through the arraignment and bail process to lend their expertise and try to move things along.

Even if there is circumstantial evidence that you were at the crime scene, prosecutors still have all their work ahead of them to prove that you are guilty of criminal damage. Your attorney will be able to discern the gaps and holes in their case and use them to raise reasonable doubt.

If you have been charged with criminal damage, you should call the Law Offices of Gary L Rohlwing. He can help you through this difficult time.

What is Considered a Criminal Damage Charge in Arizona is republished from http://www.criminal-duiattorney.com/blog/



Law Offices of Gary L Rohlwing

7112 N 55th Ave

Glendale, AZ 85301

(623) 937-1692

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from https://www.criminal-duiattorney.com/criminal-defense/damage/what-is-it-and-penalties/

What Are Dangerous Criminal Offenses in Arizona?

Dangerous criminal offenses in Arizona entail crimes with a violent act as an objective. Each of these offenses is punishable by varying jail times, depending on their details. If you are charged with a dangerous offense, you face mandatory prison time and need skilled lawyers to negotiate the possible charges.

The following are five dangerous criminal offenses in Arizona.

1. Murder

– First-degree murder
First-degree murder is the most serious offense in Arizona. The crime can be committed in two ways:

a. If the defendant plans and deliberately causes the victims death
b. When the defendant causes death during the commission of other dangerous felonies. In this case, it doesn’t matter whether or not the accused intended to cause death.

– Second-degree murder
Knowing that one’s actions will potentially cause death by creating a dangerous risk can result in second-degree murder.

Both first and second-degree murder are class 1 felony and are punishable by several years in prison when convicted.

2. Armed robbery

Armed robbery in Arizona entails an aggravated form of theft where the offender intentionally threatens another person with a deadly weapon. In Arizona, armed robbery is a very dangerous offense. A defendant of this charge should consider contacting a competent criminal attorney for representation.

3. Kidnapping

Arizona is the state with the highest kidnapping cases in the united states. Kidnapping here doesn’t only entail abducting someone and keeping them captive. A defendant commits kidnapping if they purposefully restrain a victim with intent to:

  • Hold them unwillingly for servitude
  • Inflict fear, physical injury, rape, or death to the victim
  • Hold the person as a shield or for ransom
  • Seize control of a moving vehicle, ship, or airplane

Kidnapping is a class 2 felony except when a captor voluntarily releases a victim, safely and without physical injury. A defendant will need a skilled Arizona lawyer to help negotiate their charges and possibly reduce their potential jail time.

4. Manslaughter

Manslaughter is committed when there was a significant risk of death, but the offender disregarded that threat, recklessly causing another’s death. For instance, a man killing his spouse after walking in on them cheating. Or recklessly causing an unborn child to die by physically harming the mother.

Manslaughter is a class 3 felony in Arizona.

5. Aggravated assault

In Arizona, aggravated assault is a dangerous offense that can comprise several elements, including possession of a deadly weapon. A person can be charged with aggravated assault if they:

  • Enter another’s space to cause physical injury
  • Use assault another person with a deadly weapon
  • Cause serious physical harm to another
  • If a person assaults a victim that is bound, or their capacity to resist is significantly impaired.

Aggravated assault is a class 3 felony in Arizona.

Conclusion
You undoubtedly face serious consequences when charged with a dangerous offense in Arizona. If you are in Arizona and in need of legal assistance, please contact Gary L. Rohlwing. He is experienced in the practice of criminal defense, has handled thousands of cases, is skilled, and will help negotiate your dangerous offense charges.

The following article What Are Dangerous Criminal Offenses in Arizona? Read more on: Glendale Arizona Law Offices of Gary Rohlwing



Law Offices of Gary L Rohlwing

7112 N 55th Ave

Glendale, AZ 85301

(623) 937-1692

https://goo.gl/maps/vntMC15aMUG2

from https://www.criminal-duiattorney.com/criminal-defense/felonies/what-are-dangerous-criminal-offenses-in-arizona/

Domestic Violence and Abuse Effect on the Relationship

One of the most difficult parts of the legal statutes of any state is understanding what is meant by domestic violence and domestic abuse. Both of these terms are used in the statutes of Arizona law and those of other states of the U.S.

Each of the terms refers to acts intended to harm an individual who is involved in a relationship with the perpetrator. Domestic issues can often escalate and impact a range of issues, including child custody and visitation rights.

A Threat to Health

When we think about the issues of domestic incidents, we must consider the problem of violence being committed against one person within a relationship.

Whether this is a spouse, former spouse, or a boyfriend or girlfriend, violence will lead to charges brought regarding domestic incidents. In the past, domestic incidents were often seen as a grey area in the law but, in the 21st-century, the majority of states, including Arizona, have included these laws in their statutes.

The Law Offices of Gary L. Rohlwing will be able to provide support and assistance for those who are involved in a domestic incident which leads to charges being brought against one or both partners in a relationship.

The passing of the Violence Against Women Act in 1994 by the Federal Government is often seen as a watershed moment in the battle against violence in domestic situations, but there is still work to be done to protect every person from domestic incidents.

Damage to Material Objects

Many states expanded their terminology regarding domestic incidents to allow the legal sector to discuss damage to material objects. This change has been important because the legal sector and social commentators are seeing the widespread issue of the expansion of violence to the property owned by a person in a relationship. This can include damage done to a vehicle, home, or belongings of one person in a relationship by the other.

One of the charges that may be seen is arson, where one partner in a relationship burns the property of the other out of anger or in order to maintain control of them. The expansion of the many laws around the U.S. regarding domestic violence can now include intent to cause harm and it includes child abuse in the laws of most states across the nation.

What is Classed as a Relationship?

When children face violence and are a part of charges brought because of a domestic incident, the person involved is usually a parent, stepparent, or guardian of the child. Alongside spouses and ex-spouses, a person is often classed as being in a relationship if they have an ongoing sexual relationship with the other person involved.

When domestic incidents take place, the stress and strain caused by these charges can be great and you may want or require a respected attorney to fight in your corner. Domestic incidents will often bring up the history of the couple and family involved, meaning unhappy memories can be brought to the surface for all involved. Gary L. Rohlwing is ready and able to fight to make sure your story is heard.

Domestic Violence and Abuse Effect on the Relationship was first published to Glendale Arizona Law Offices of Gary Rohlwing



Law Offices of Gary L Rohlwing

7112 N 55th Ave

Glendale, AZ 85301

(623) 937-1692

https://goo.gl/maps/vntMC15aMUG2

from https://www.criminal-duiattorney.com/criminal-defense/domestic-violence/impact-of-domestic-issues-health-damage-family/

Is Littering a Criminal Offense in Arizona?

Littering is causing a lot of environmental pollution. It’s almost impossible to find someone who has never littered at some point in their life and, although it doesn’t seem like a significant crime, littering is a serious offense. Whether deliberately or accidentally, you may have committed the crime of littering.

In most states, littering is a criminal offense punishable by law and Arizona is no exception. The consequences of this offense largely depend on the circumstances of the crime. Most people are still unaware of the severity of the outcomes, while others don’t even know it’s a crime.

Littering Charges

Littering Charges in Arizona

Charges for littering are mainly dependent on the circumstances. Littering is widely classified, and that means there are numerous instances where you may receive criminal littering charges. The criminal statute of Arizona covering polluting or criminal littering is under the code A.R.S. 13-1603. Here are some cases when littering can land you in a criminal court under the law of Arizona:

1. When a person throws, drops, places, or allows dropping on public or private property any waste, injurious and destructive litter, which a person does not remove instantly.

2. When a person releases or allows to be released any oil products, sewage, and harmful substances in water bodies or on beaches inside the state.

3. When a person throws any earth, stones, ores, or minerals on any land.

All these instances are where a person commits criminal littering or polluting without any lawful authority. The consequences of criminal littering consider the weight, the item, and the place on which it happened in Arizona. Criminal littering is punishable as:

1. A Class 1 misdemeanor if the person places injurious or destructive material on or at least 50 feet from a highway, shore, or coastline of any waters that the public uses. It is punishable by six months in jail, a fine of $2500, and extra charges.

2. A Class 1 misdemeanor if a person is knowingly in violation and the amount of litter or substances is less than 300 pounds but more than 100 pounds or fewer than 100 cubic feet but more than 35 cubic feet noncommercial purposes.

3. A Class 2 misdemeanor if the act of littering does not apply to any of the other instances. It is punishable by up to 4 months in jail, a $750 fine, and extra charges.

4. A Class 6 felony if a person knowingly violates the law and litter an amount exceeding 300 pounds or 100 cubic feet in volume or it is done for a commercial purpose.

The most frequent form of littering is throwing food products or cigarette butts on the ground. If you throw one from your vehicle on a highway or maybe a beach, it’s a Class 1 misdemeanor. Most of the time, you can be pulled over and handed a ticket if you are caught doing so.

But, many other situations call for felony classifications. The most severe case of littering is a class 1 felony. It applies mostly to companies and not the public.

If you’re a first-time offender, you’ll probably receive a fine and possible other minor punishments. A second-time offender or more repeat charges will face more severe consequences. These include higher fines, stiffer penalties, and having more criminal charges on your record.

It’s advisable to contact a lawyer and discuss your case. They can help you reach an ideal outcome and even help with limiting your charges.

Do you need help from a criminal attorney?

You should take charges of criminal littering seriously. The consequences of this crime are severe in order to curb the act of pollution and illegal dumping. You should, therefore, seek legal services as soon as possible. You may need a criminal lawyer to handle your case.

Gary L. Rohlwing Law Offices has more than 30 years of experience in criminal defense. The firm offers legal services that can help minimize the impact of your littering charges. You will get a chance to have the best representation at competitive prices. Furthermore, you will need an aggressive criminal attorney like Gary L. Rohlwing, who will help provide a clear understanding of your charges.

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Law Offices of Gary L Rohlwing

7112 N 55th Ave

Glendale, AZ 85301

(623) 937-1692

https://goo.gl/maps/vntMC15aMUG2

from https://www.criminal-duiattorney.com/criminal-defense/misdemeanors/is-littering-a-criminal-offense-in-arizona/

Understanding the Types of Criminal Damage Offenses

There are various criminal charges one can face in the state of Arizona. The penalties for the charges often vary depending on the criminal offence. For instance, if a person is charged with criminal damage, this can mean that they are charged with damaging or defacing property that is not theirs, or it can mean that they “tampered” with a property that belongs to another person. It’s a broad charge.

criminal in court
It’s always important to understand what you are being charged with. Sometimes people are arrested and they don’t understand the charges they are facing. Understanding the various criminal charges that exist not only helps you avoid committing them but makes you more aware of your rights and what you are dealing with in case you are charged with the crime.

For instance, you might be surprised to know that you can be accused of criminal damage to property co-owned with your spouse.

But, with proper knowledge and an experienced criminal defense lawyer, it will be easier to fight against the allegations levelled against you.

Below are the 6 types of criminal damage:

1. Reckless damage to another person’s property

– This is a situation where a person intentionally or unintentionally damages the property of another person. If the person whose property has been damaged files a lawsuit, then the defendant is likely to be ordered by the court to pay for the damages caused.

2. Damaging property owned by a utility

– Although it doesn’t happen commonly, anyone found guilty of damaging property belonging to a utility can face criminal charges.

3. Tampering with property with the intention of impairing its value

– Tampering with property here doesn’t necessarily refer to physical or permanent damaging of property. It may also involve tampering of property in a manner that they can still be fixed or reversed – provided the value of the property has been affected in some way.

4. Reckless drawing or writing graffiti on another person’s building without their express permission.

– The owner of the building can hire a criminal attorney and launch a lawsuit to charge the person who commits such an offence. The judge will review the case based on facts presented and decide the amount of monetary compensation to award the plaintiff if they win.

5. Parking a vehicle or vehicles in a manner that deprives water to livestock

– This charge rarely occurs but can attract serious criminal charges to anyone found culpable.

6. Intentional tampering of property belonging to a utility

– This is another type of criminal damage that can attract serious penalties. As long as the criminal damage charge is proved, the person found guilty may be ordered by the court to either restore the damaged property or pay a certain amount of money.

These are the types of criminal damage which you can be charged within Arizona. Most people aren’t aware that these charges even exist when they are arrested. Though most people are vaguely aware that you shouldn’t mess with a property that isn’t theirs, they have no idea the potential backlash they might face if they do so.

If you are arrested, the best thing to do is to contact an Arizona lawyer from the Law Offices of Gary L Rohlwing who can help you fight the charges.

The post Understanding the Types of Criminal Damage Offenses is courtesy of http://www.criminal-duiattorney.com/blog/



Law Offices of Gary L Rohlwing

7112 N 55th Ave

Glendale, AZ 85301

(623) 937-1692

https://goo.gl/maps/vntMC15aMUG2

from https://www.criminal-duiattorney.com/criminal-defense/damage/understanding-the-types-of-offenses/

How Much Can an Arizona DUI Raise Your Insurance Rates?

Driving while under the influence of alcohol is a serious offence in Arizona.

You can definitely expect your car insurance rates to increase but the amount of the rate increase will depend on a few different factors. The average Arizona driver can expect a 131% increase in overall insurance costs.

This is far higher than the national average increase of 72% after a DUI. A DUI can actually raise car insurance rates more than any other driving violation.

You may need to shop around to find the best possible rate because your current insurer may impose a stricter penalty than some other companies.

Arizona has some of the strictest penalties for DUI offenders. The offense may stay on your record for up to five years after you are charged.

Most insurers won’t negotiate their policies because their actuaries help them define the specific rates.

If you’ve been convicted of a DUI, then the company assumes insuring you is riskier than insuring other drivers.

Arizona had 4,854 alcohol-related car accidents in 2017.

That number amounts to approximately one alcohol-related car crash for every 1,500 residents. Arizona residents are required by law to carry a minimum of liability insurance. These costs will drastically increase if you are found guilty of driving under the influence, and you may face additional civil lawsuits if you injure a person or damage property.

The average car insurance cost for an Arizona resident is around $1,300.

A DUI conviction could raise these costs to $3,000 or more per year. The premium is typically the amount that increases, so the amount you’re paying the insurance company each month will be significantly higher.

However, you may be able to do some things to reduce the increased rate a bit. If you previously had full coverage, then you may want to switch to minimum coverage for a while.

The impact of the DUI on your insurance rate will lessen over time and after five years it should no longer affect your rate at all.

If you are found guilty of driving while under the influence, then the state may require your insurer to fill out an SR-22 document. This document proves to the state of Arizona that your insurance meets the law’s minimum requirements. This will inevitably result in your insurer finding out about your DUI conviction.

If you’re being charged with a DUI, then you should definitely consult with a reputable DUI attorney.

Sometimes attorneys can find a procedural error that nullifies the arrest. This could ultimately get the charges dropped. If your current insurer finds out about the DUI, then your existing policy will be rewritten to include it in the premium cost.

A DUI may be charged as a misdemeanor or a felony in Arizona. The specific charge depends on the severity of the circumstances. If the plea deal you are offered isn’t acceptable, then you or your attorney may decide to go to trial.

A plea bargain will usually require an admission of guilt. This means that your insurance rates will definitely increase. This may still be preferable because you’ll able to avoid heftier fines, jail time, and/or a suspended license.

If a DUI lawyer wins your case, then you won’t have to worry about your insurance rates increasing. Winning a DUI case can be very difficult, and the penalties may be harsher if you end up going to court and losing.

The Law Offices of Gary L. Rohlwing has handled many DUI cases. Gary has personally handled over 3,500 cases. An attorney may potentially be able to prevent the state of Arizona from convicting you and increasing your insurance premiums.

How Much Can an Arizona DUI Raise Your Insurance Rates? Read more on: Law Offices of Gary Rohlwing



Law Offices of Gary L Rohlwing

7112 N 55th Ave

Glendale, AZ 85301

(623) 937-1692

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